For Collectors

 

www.2020wines.com

***

2020 Cotner Ave. – West Los Angeles CA 90025 – 310.447.2020

Owned by Robert Golbahar, this LA wine merchants claims to provides wines to the hollywood stars and mentions Sandra Bullock among others as clients. Whether that impresses you or not, the facts are that Twenty-Twenty Wine Merchants is a well-known store with over 4,000 square feet of refrigerated wine lockers kept at 60 degrees F, which can accommodate up to 400 cases of wine each.

“Now with our new racking, we can store thousands of bottles in the refrigerated showroom, ” Golbahar says. Many clients have wine lockers at Twenty-Twenty; indeed, for $500-700 a year, a collector can rent a 25-case locker.  It is natural enough to envision Barbara Walters having her own wine locker here, isn’t it? Or Hugh Downes.

Moving on to its website, 2020 offers over 300 Cabernets and 118 Pinot Noirs including a few half-bottles. Among the Cabs you might want to hail is a 1997 Screaming Eagle for $5,500 and a rare double magnum of Phelps 1997 Insignia for $3,395. If you are looking for only one Screaming Eagle and not working on a vertical, you better off looking at the 2009 Screaming Eagle which is still in its prime and sells for just under $3,000.

The real surprise here are the Three Shafer Hillside Select Cabs, 2001,  2002 and 2010, all of which are 100 point wines and quite attractively priced at around $650 a pop.

This site has most of the other big Cabernet names…Dalla Valle, Hundred Acres, Checkerboard, Tor, and Pride Mountain Reserve.

Of the 200 Bordeaux reds listed by 2020, they range from incredible new vintages to incredibly old and probably over the hill older fare. I’m assuming the older wines are selected for for customers looking for a particular birth year or those wanting to experience a 1928, 1929, 1948, 1955 or 1961, all fabled Bordeaux vintages. I have to admit being just a little intrigued by the magnum of 1947 Chateau Canon, and only wish I had $8,000 in spare change.

Without question, there are truly great Bordeaux wines  available here. But keep in mind that when a Parker note says the 1928 Chateau Beychevelle, tasted in 1988, could easily live another ten years, he probably tasted the wine at the Chateau where it has been cellared since 1928. Also, keep in mind that other older wines such as the 1966, 1985, and 1989 Chateau Lafite were most likely purchased from a private collection and then you have to be ever so mindful of the wine’s provenance.

The Specials include wines that are less well known but high scoring such as the 2103 Etre Chardonnay from the Sonoma Coast. This 93 point unknown is a super Chardonnay for $29.99. The 1999 Beaucastel seems to stand out in a list with Catena Malbec and Concha Y Toro wines. But if there a method in their madness, the specials try to include many wines listed in The Wine Spectator’s Top 100 of the year. Since quite a few are priced below $50 a bottle, you can visualize Sandra Bullock adding several bottles of 2010 Quinta do Crasto Old Vine Reserva at $44.77 because she knows this is a great wine to serve to friends.

The most unpredictable list and well-worth your time, if you are not a Hollywood celebrity,  is the Featured Wines. It includes a 2001 Chateauneuf-du-pape from Vieux Donjon for $70, a 2010 Calcareous Syrah for $42.00, a 2010 Rombauer Zin for $24.95 and 2010 Melville Syrah for $29.75. These are excellent wines, reasonably priced, and the kind of wines you can drink over the next few years without dipping into your cellar prematurely.

Pros: Offers most of the top-tier producers from CA and France.

Good selection of older vintages

Cons: No discounts and no shipping breaks

Author: robywine, norm roby

My career as a wine journalist/critic began in 1975 when my article about California Petite Sirah was published. My focus remained on California as I edited a monthly wine magazine and then moved on to The Wine Spectator in 1981. Over the following years, my column appeared under the banner of “Stormin’ Norman, and I also wrote articles about wine collectors and wine auctions. Without getting into a year by year bio, let me try to summarize here. During my time with The Spectator which I enjoyed immensely, I taught wine classes at a culinary school and at other venues in San Francisco. Before venturing into wine, teaching was my thing, English Lit and Rhetoric. After The Spectator I was the U.S. Contributor to Decanter Magazine, writing mostly about California, but also expanding into Washington State and Oregon. My Decanter years began in 1992 and after buying a summer home in France in 2000, I traveled throughout France and eventually published articles about St. Emilion, Castillon, Bergerac, Minervois, Roussillon, Luberon, Provence, and Alsace. Also, around 2000, my wife began working for Cousino-Macul in Chile, so we tasted and traveled our way through Chile and, of course, managed to fly over the Andes and explore and taste our way through Argentina. As travel lovers, we have also spent many interesting days visiting the wine regions of Spain, Italy, Portugal, Sicily, Greece, and New Zealand. And to come to a close, I was Director of a Charity Wine Auction for 20 years, 1992-2000 that benefitted a local hospital. That brought me in contact with wine collectors and to the auction scene. And finally, I co-authored a book, The Connoisseurs’ Guide to California Wine published by Alfred A. Knopf. It went through 4 editions and sold over 500.000 copies.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s